Chickadee dee dee dee…

In my backyard, here in East-central Wisconsin, Black-capped Chickadees are one of the most common visitors to our bird feeders. These tiny little birds are seemingly full of energy and are fun to watch. They will often fly down to perch on the feeder, quickly grab a sunflower seed and flutter back up into a nearby tree to crack open the shell and eat the nutritious seed inside. As soon as that one is gone it flies right back to the feeder for the next one.

Black-capped Chickadees are easy to identify both visually and by their songs. These small birds have a dark black cap on top of their heads, and a black throat patch under their beaks, with a white stripe running from the sides of their beak across their cheeks to the back of their heads. The Chickadee’s body and wings are primarily a brownish gray. In most of their range their typical song is a two or three note fee-bee. When they become frightened They will give their signature Chickadee-dee-dee-dee call adding more dees as the perceived threat level increases. The Black-capped Chickadee’s range stretches across the Northern half of the United states, into Canada and along the Pacific coast into Alaska. Along the Southern edge of their range they may share habitat with the Carolina Chickadee. Throughout the Rocky Mountains you will also find Mountain Chickadees, and Chestnut-backed Chickadees can be found along the Pacific coast.

Chickadees are curious little birds, even of humans; while sitting still in the woods, I have had them land on my hat, boot, knee, and even my shoulder. They are fun to watch as they dart around looking for insects, seeds and berries. Putting sunflower seed or suet feeders in your yard is a great way to attract Chickadees to your yard, and putting up a Chickadee nest box in the spring may keep these non-migratory birds frequenting your yard all year long. You can find my Wild Stewardship bird feeders and nest boxes at www.wildstewardship.com or search for my Wild Stewardship products on ebay.  Please also like my Wild Stewardship page on Facebook, and check out my shop there as well. Most important of all, get outside and enjoy nature!